Biography

barbara-schreiber.jpg

My paintings and drawings combine pretty pictures and ugly subjects. I sometimes see them as dispatches from the borderland between happy denial and grim reality.

Over the years, they have touched on a variety of subjects: over-stimulation, boredom, travel, self-improvement, death, thwarted expectations and stuff in the backyard.

My most recent work tells a distinctly American story—one of restlessness, one of real estate, bracketed by the open road and the gated community.

These paintings are in the purest sense landscapes, since they are filled with deserts, mountains, fields and subdivisions. But they are really about the collision of the built and natural worlds, about battles in which outcomes are uncertain. They variously address threats presented by development, natural and human-made disaster, greed or obliviousness. I am frankly perplexed by the number and intensity of animals in much of my recent work. I don’t think of myself as an animal person, but have concluded that on some level I must identify with animals, particularly small wild ones—adorable, understood by few and ultimately alone in a complex, fast-moving world.


Résumé

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Statement

My paintings and drawings combine pretty pictures and ugly subjects. I sometimes see them as dispatches from the borderland between happy denial and grim reality.

Lately, I’ve become aware of how my work tells a distinctly American story—one of restlessness, one of real estate, bracketed by the open road and the gated community.

My recent paintings are in the purest sense landscapes, since they are filled with deserts, mountains, fields and subdivisions. But they are really about the collision of the built and natural worlds, about battles in which outcomes are uncertain. They variously address threats presented by development, natural and human-made disaster, greed or obliviousness.

I am frankly perplexed by the number and intensity of animals in much of my recent work. I don’t think of myself as an animal person, but have concluded that on some level I must identify with animals, particularly small wild ones—adorable, understood by few and ultimately alone in a complex, fast-moving world.